The New York Subway: A Century of Progress in Motion - 1904-2004
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Museum Resources Related References Educators Notes
 
R Related References
 

In addition to the Transit Museum itself, there a great many books, films and web sites about New York City subway history that can be consulted for this project. There are also many resources pertaining to the writing of a good article and to journalistic conventions. Here are a few related resources:

Books:

    722 Miles - The Building of the Subways by Clifton Hood.
    "Clifton Hood traces the complex and fascinating history of the New York City subway system. At its opening in 1904, the tracks covered the twenty-two miles from City Hall up to 145th Street and Lenox Avenue, the longest stretch ever built at one time. From that initial route through the completion of the IND, the Independent Subway, in the 1940s, the subway grew to cover 722 miles -- long enough to reach from New York to Chicago."

    This book is usually available at the Transit Museum store, and is also available online.

    722 Miles - Book Cover

    Evolution of New York City Subways by Gene Sansone
    An Illustrated History of New York City's Transit Cars, 1867-1997

    A collaborative labor of love by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the New York Transit Museum, Gene Sansone's Evolution of New York City Subways: An Illustrated History of New York City's Transit Cars, 1867-1997 -- now available from the Johns Hopkins University Press with a new foreword by Clifton Hood -- offers an extensive array of photographs, line drawings, and stories about the city's most treasured railcars. Subway buffs, railfans, students of New York City history, and specialists in the history of technology will appreciate this authoritative account. MTA New York City Transit and Sansone provide a record of the rolling stock that helped make New York City one of the great cities of the world."

    This book is usually available at the Transit Museum store, and is also available online.


    Evolution of New York City Subways - Book Cover

    Tunneling to the Future by Peter Derrick
    The Story of the Great Subway Expansion That Saved New York.

    "In 1910, New York City was bursting at the seams as more and more people crowded into a limited supply of housing in the tenement districts of Manhattan and the older areas of Brooklyn. With no outlet for its exploding population, and the burgeoning social problems created by the overwhelming congestion, New York faced a serious crisis which city and state leaders addressed with dramatic measures. In March 1913, public officials and officers of the two existing rapid transit networks shook hands to seal a deal for a greatly expanded subway system which would more than double the size of the two existing transit networks.

    At the time the largest and most expensive single municipal project ever attempted, the Dual System of Rapid Transit set the pattern of growth in New York City for decades to come, helped provide millions of families a better quality of life, and, in the words of Manhattan borough president George McAneny (1910-1913), "proved the city's physical salvation." It stands as that rare success story, an enormously complicated project undertaken against great odds which proved successful beyond all measure. Published in conjunction with the History of the City of New York Project."

    This book is usually available at the Transit Museum store, and is also available online.

    Tunneling to the Future - Book Cover

Web Sites:

Journalism Online Resources

NYC Subway History Online Resources


   
 
       

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